A Taste of Shanghai (2011)
June 2011
PHOTO: View of Pudong from The Bund
We were fortunate to have some time on our business trip during the night and on our last afternoon to be able to experience some of the sights and sounds of Shanghai. The business trip was actually to go to an exhibit which entailed much walking and so I did not bring my big camera. Armed with my Olympus XZ-1, I took some photos of some of the few areas we were able to visit during our stay in Shanghai.
Air Pollution in Shanghai
What I noticed immediately on my first day in Shanghai was the blurry air… you can notice the low contrast of the buildings that you see in the distance. As the weather was not cold, this was definitely not fog but smog. This is most definitely the result of fast and massive industrialization in China’s recent history. What is good though is that they are doing their best at slowly reducing the damage to their ecology. Policies are being implemented and I hear that China is now the leader in advancing green technology! In Shanghai you will notice a lot of greenery, and well maintained at that! I could even boldly compare the amount of greenery to Singapore and other advanced cities. 
Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel
Pudong, Shanghai
The Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel is a 5-star luxury hotel that I saw everyday as I walked from the hotel to the trade show. Jumeirah is the same company handling the 7-star luxury hotel (Burj Al Arab) in Dubai. I found the architecture and design very interesting. 


The Bund (Wai Tan) or Zhongshan Road
We were able to walk along the Wai Tan on our second night at Shanghai. The Modern Shanghai buildings on the Pudong side (across the river) were very impressive. We saw the lights of the Shanghai Space Needle and the Shanghai World Financial Center (4th tallest in the world). On the otherhand, the Puxi side (where Wan Tai is found) has the old buildings built and designed by the Europeans. These antique buildings are well restored and fully functional as well.


The Bund along the river with the old buildings beside it
Nanjing Road
Nanjing Road is a pedestrianized street in Puxi, Shanghai. The atmosphere of the place felt much the same with Wang Fu Jing pedestrianized street in Beijing.

Thumb Plaza
We went a couple of times to Thumb Plaza for some of our meals and walking around. It was an open type mall where there are plenty of open areas to walk around in. Unlike the malls in the Philippines (main recreational area in the Philippines) which are generally in closed buildings, the main recreational areas in China (and other countries) are open parks, plazas and pedestrianized roads. It’s cheaper on the air-conditioning and more natural I would say. Heavy downpours in the tropical Philippines though can make open plazas and parks less successful though.

Immaculate Conception (Catholic) Church in Shanghai
Tian Zhu Jiao (Religion of the Lord in Heaven)
We saw a small Catholic Church across the Thumbs Plaza; the Immaculate Conception Church. The church was pretty new (only 6 years old) with a simple design inside and out. I am not too religious but it was a good feeling to see a church and some catholic presence in the very business/economic atmosphere of China.

Yuyuan Cha Ye Tea Shop
Tea shops in China have an very interesting sit down and taste marketing strategy. They use various tea implements and specialized tea tables to market and sell their products. My uncle purchased some tea for his friend costing RMB 3,000/kg or USD 480/Kg! The most expensive tea according the staff there is worth USD 10,000/Kg! 
Maglev Train & the Pudong International Airport
We took the Maglev train to the Pudong Airport from the city. I honestly wasn’t fully impressed as the train station looked like any normal train station really (what was I expecting, spacemen?). Also, the train looked the same as other high speed trains (I think I am expecting too much from China :P). 
This train is actually only one of three Maglev trains servicing the public in the world! We traveled 30km in just 7 minutes at a top speed of 301 kph. The advertised no-vibration though was definitely not true. I definitely felt vibration during the ride. I read that the Maglev can run upto 450 kph; the Chinese run them at 300 kph only (optimal speed) to save on costs for maintenance.

Pudong International Airport was gigantic with very modern non-Chinese décor/design. We noticed though that they turned down or off the condenser of their air-conditioning; it was actually uncomfortably warm at the airport. It was pretty cold outside at the low 20’s (degree C) and they probably turned off the condenser to save on electricity. I guess you can take away the Chinese from the décor/design but you can’t take the Chinese (frugal values) out of the operations! :p


for more photos of shanghai in my flickr click here
for more photos of travel in my flickr click here

A Taste of Shanghai (2011)
June 2011
PHOTO: View of Pudong from The Bund

We were fortunate to have some time on our business trip during the night and on our last afternoon to be able to experience some of the sights and sounds of Shanghai. The business trip was actually to go to an exhibit which entailed much walking and so I did not bring my big camera. Armed with my Olympus XZ-1, I took some photos of some of the few areas we were able to visit during our stay in Shanghai.

Air Pollution in Shanghai

What I noticed immediately on my first day in Shanghai was the blurry air… you can notice the low contrast of the buildings that you see in the distance. As the weather was not cold, this was definitely not fog but smog. This is most definitely the result of fast and massive industrialization in China’s recent history. What is good though is that they are doing their best at slowly reducing the damage to their ecology. Policies are being implemented and I hear that China is now the leader in advancing green technology! In Shanghai you will notice a lot of greenery, and well maintained at that! I could even boldly compare the amount of greenery to Singapore and other advanced cities.

Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel
Pudong, Shanghai

The Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel is a 5-star luxury hotel that I saw everyday as I walked from the hotel to the trade show. Jumeirah is the same company handling the 7-star luxury hotel (Burj Al Arab) in Dubai. I found the architecture and design very interesting.



The Bund (Wai Tan) or Zhongshan Road

We were able to walk along the Wai Tan on our second night at Shanghai. The Modern Shanghai buildings on the Pudong side (across the river) were very impressive. We saw the lights of the Shanghai Space Needle and the Shanghai World Financial Center (4th tallest in the world). On the otherhand, the Puxi side (where Wan Tai is found) has the old buildings built and designed by the Europeans. These antique buildings are well restored and fully functional as well.


The Bund along the river with the old buildings beside it


Nanjing Road

Nanjing Road is a pedestrianized street in Puxi, Shanghai. The atmosphere of the place felt much the same with Wang Fu Jing pedestrianized street in Beijing.



Thumb Plaza

We went a couple of times to Thumb Plaza for some of our meals and walking around. It was an open type mall where there are plenty of open areas to walk around in. Unlike the malls in the Philippines (main recreational area in the Philippines) which are generally in closed buildings, the main recreational areas in China (and other countries) are open parks, plazas and pedestrianized roads. It’s cheaper on the air-conditioning and more natural I would say. Heavy downpours in the tropical Philippines though can make open plazas and parks less successful though.



Immaculate Conception (Catholic) Church in Shanghai
Tian Zhu Jiao (Religion of the Lord in Heaven)

We saw a small Catholic Church across the Thumbs Plaza; the Immaculate Conception Church. The church was pretty new (only 6 years old) with a simple design inside and out. I am not too religious but it was a good feeling to see a church and some catholic presence in the very business/economic atmosphere of China.



Yuyuan Cha Ye Tea Shop

Tea shops in China have an very interesting sit down and taste marketing strategy. They use various tea implements and specialized tea tables to market and sell their products. My uncle purchased some tea for his friend costing RMB 3,000/kg or USD 480/Kg! The most expensive tea according the staff there is worth USD 10,000/Kg!

Maglev Train & the Pudong International Airport

We took the Maglev train to the Pudong Airport from the city. I honestly wasn’t fully impressed as the train station looked like any normal train station really (what was I expecting, spacemen?). Also, the train looked the same as other high speed trains (I think I am expecting too much from China :P).

This train is actually only one of three Maglev trains servicing the public in the world! We traveled 30km in just 7 minutes at a top speed of 301 kph. The advertised no-vibration though was definitely not true. I definitely felt vibration during the ride. I read that the Maglev can run upto 450 kph; the Chinese run them at 300 kph only (optimal speed) to save on costs for maintenance.



Pudong International Airport was gigantic with very modern non-Chinese décor/design. We noticed though that they turned down or off the condenser of their air-conditioning; it was actually uncomfortably warm at the airport. It was pretty cold outside at the low 20’s (degree C) and they probably turned off the condenser to save on electricity. I guess you can take away the Chinese from the décor/design but you can’t take the Chinese (frugal values) out of the operations! :p



for more photos of shanghai in my flickr click here
for more photos of travel in my flickr click here
A Taste of Shanghai (2011)
June 2011
PHOTO: View of Pudong from The Bund
We were fortunate to have some time on our business trip during the night and on our last afternoon to be able to experience some of the sights and sounds of Shanghai. The business trip was actually to go to an exhibit which entailed much walking and so I did not bring my big camera. Armed with my Olympus XZ-1, I took some photos of some of the few areas we were able to visit during our stay in Shanghai.
Air Pollution in Shanghai
What I noticed immediately on my first day in Shanghai was the blurry air… you can notice the low contrast of the buildings that you see in the distance. As the weather was not cold, this was definitely not fog but smog. This is most definitely the result of fast and massive industrialization in China’s recent history. What is good though is that they are doing their best at slowly reducing the damage to their ecology. Policies are being implemented and I hear that China is now the leader in advancing green technology! In Shanghai you will notice a lot of greenery, and well maintained at that! I could even boldly compare the amount of greenery to Singapore and other advanced cities. 
Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel
Pudong, Shanghai
The Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel is a 5-star luxury hotel that I saw everyday as I walked from the hotel to the trade show. Jumeirah is the same company handling the 7-star luxury hotel (Burj Al Arab) in Dubai. I found the architecture and design very interesting. 


The Bund (Wai Tan) or Zhongshan Road
We were able to walk along the Wai Tan on our second night at Shanghai. The Modern Shanghai buildings on the Pudong side (across the river) were very impressive. We saw the lights of the Shanghai Space Needle and the Shanghai World Financial Center (4th tallest in the world). On the otherhand, the Puxi side (where Wan Tai is found) has the old buildings built and designed by the Europeans. These antique buildings are well restored and fully functional as well.


The Bund along the river with the old buildings beside it
Nanjing Road
Nanjing Road is a pedestrianized street in Puxi, Shanghai. The atmosphere of the place felt much the same with Wang Fu Jing pedestrianized street in Beijing.

Thumb Plaza
We went a couple of times to Thumb Plaza for some of our meals and walking around. It was an open type mall where there are plenty of open areas to walk around in. Unlike the malls in the Philippines (main recreational area in the Philippines) which are generally in closed buildings, the main recreational areas in China (and other countries) are open parks, plazas and pedestrianized roads. It’s cheaper on the air-conditioning and more natural I would say. Heavy downpours in the tropical Philippines though can make open plazas and parks less successful though.

Immaculate Conception (Catholic) Church in Shanghai
Tian Zhu Jiao (Religion of the Lord in Heaven)
We saw a small Catholic Church across the Thumbs Plaza; the Immaculate Conception Church. The church was pretty new (only 6 years old) with a simple design inside and out. I am not too religious but it was a good feeling to see a church and some catholic presence in the very business/economic atmosphere of China.

Yuyuan Cha Ye Tea Shop
Tea shops in China have an very interesting sit down and taste marketing strategy. They use various tea implements and specialized tea tables to market and sell their products. My uncle purchased some tea for his friend costing RMB 3,000/kg or USD 480/Kg! The most expensive tea according the staff there is worth USD 10,000/Kg! 
Maglev Train & the Pudong International Airport
We took the Maglev train to the Pudong Airport from the city. I honestly wasn’t fully impressed as the train station looked like any normal train station really (what was I expecting, spacemen?). Also, the train looked the same as other high speed trains (I think I am expecting too much from China :P). 
This train is actually only one of three Maglev trains servicing the public in the world! We traveled 30km in just 7 minutes at a top speed of 301 kph. The advertised no-vibration though was definitely not true. I definitely felt vibration during the ride. I read that the Maglev can run upto 450 kph; the Chinese run them at 300 kph only (optimal speed) to save on costs for maintenance.

Pudong International Airport was gigantic with very modern non-Chinese décor/design. We noticed though that they turned down or off the condenser of their air-conditioning; it was actually uncomfortably warm at the airport. It was pretty cold outside at the low 20’s (degree C) and they probably turned off the condenser to save on electricity. I guess you can take away the Chinese from the décor/design but you can’t take the Chinese (frugal values) out of the operations! :p


for more photos of shanghai in my flickr click here
for more photos of travel in my flickr click here

A Taste of Shanghai (2011)
June 2011
PHOTO: View of Pudong from The Bund

We were fortunate to have some time on our business trip during the night and on our last afternoon to be able to experience some of the sights and sounds of Shanghai. The business trip was actually to go to an exhibit which entailed much walking and so I did not bring my big camera. Armed with my Olympus XZ-1, I took some photos of some of the few areas we were able to visit during our stay in Shanghai.

Air Pollution in Shanghai

What I noticed immediately on my first day in Shanghai was the blurry air… you can notice the low contrast of the buildings that you see in the distance. As the weather was not cold, this was definitely not fog but smog. This is most definitely the result of fast and massive industrialization in China’s recent history. What is good though is that they are doing their best at slowly reducing the damage to their ecology. Policies are being implemented and I hear that China is now the leader in advancing green technology! In Shanghai you will notice a lot of greenery, and well maintained at that! I could even boldly compare the amount of greenery to Singapore and other advanced cities.

Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel
Pudong, Shanghai

The Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel is a 5-star luxury hotel that I saw everyday as I walked from the hotel to the trade show. Jumeirah is the same company handling the 7-star luxury hotel (Burj Al Arab) in Dubai. I found the architecture and design very interesting.



The Bund (Wai Tan) or Zhongshan Road

We were able to walk along the Wai Tan on our second night at Shanghai. The Modern Shanghai buildings on the Pudong side (across the river) were very impressive. We saw the lights of the Shanghai Space Needle and the Shanghai World Financial Center (4th tallest in the world). On the otherhand, the Puxi side (where Wan Tai is found) has the old buildings built and designed by the Europeans. These antique buildings are well restored and fully functional as well.


The Bund along the river with the old buildings beside it


Nanjing Road

Nanjing Road is a pedestrianized street in Puxi, Shanghai. The atmosphere of the place felt much the same with Wang Fu Jing pedestrianized street in Beijing.



Thumb Plaza

We went a couple of times to Thumb Plaza for some of our meals and walking around. It was an open type mall where there are plenty of open areas to walk around in. Unlike the malls in the Philippines (main recreational area in the Philippines) which are generally in closed buildings, the main recreational areas in China (and other countries) are open parks, plazas and pedestrianized roads. It’s cheaper on the air-conditioning and more natural I would say. Heavy downpours in the tropical Philippines though can make open plazas and parks less successful though.



Immaculate Conception (Catholic) Church in Shanghai
Tian Zhu Jiao (Religion of the Lord in Heaven)

We saw a small Catholic Church across the Thumbs Plaza; the Immaculate Conception Church. The church was pretty new (only 6 years old) with a simple design inside and out. I am not too religious but it was a good feeling to see a church and some catholic presence in the very business/economic atmosphere of China.



Yuyuan Cha Ye Tea Shop

Tea shops in China have an very interesting sit down and taste marketing strategy. They use various tea implements and specialized tea tables to market and sell their products. My uncle purchased some tea for his friend costing RMB 3,000/kg or USD 480/Kg! The most expensive tea according the staff there is worth USD 10,000/Kg!

Maglev Train & the Pudong International Airport

We took the Maglev train to the Pudong Airport from the city. I honestly wasn’t fully impressed as the train station looked like any normal train station really (what was I expecting, spacemen?). Also, the train looked the same as other high speed trains (I think I am expecting too much from China :P).

This train is actually only one of three Maglev trains servicing the public in the world! We traveled 30km in just 7 minutes at a top speed of 301 kph. The advertised no-vibration though was definitely not true. I definitely felt vibration during the ride. I read that the Maglev can run upto 450 kph; the Chinese run them at 300 kph only (optimal speed) to save on costs for maintenance.



Pudong International Airport was gigantic with very modern non-Chinese décor/design. We noticed though that they turned down or off the condenser of their air-conditioning; it was actually uncomfortably warm at the airport. It was pretty cold outside at the low 20’s (degree C) and they probably turned off the condenser to save on electricity. I guess you can take away the Chinese from the décor/design but you can’t take the Chinese (frugal values) out of the operations! :p



for more photos of shanghai in my flickr click here
for more photos of travel in my flickr click here

Notes:

  1. snapsnstories posted this

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